“Shelter In Place” by CL McBeth-Collins

$100.00

Description

Collagraph

17″ high x 13″ wide

Buy now and pick up at the Gallery at the end of the show, beginning on the 20th of February.  Shipping cost will vary depending on distance; please contact us for a shipping estimate.

To see our video about the artist’s pieces in “Quarantine”, go to youtu.be/hsAZ9W5VZp8?t=138.

“On March 19, 2020, a flurry of texts flew among six printmakers about an upcoming group show in Williamsport.  The string starts requesting work by the following Friday.  Then Text #3:

    Wait, I honestly just heard this: Governor ordered shutdown of non-life-sustaining businesses.  We are off.  I think

“The next month I watched live stream tutorials generously shared by UK printmaker Laura Boswell.  She embodies the exploration, dedication to craft and hard work that are hallmarks of printmaking.  I stocked up on linoleum and relief ink.  I had everything that I needed to continue in that form at home.  But I missed the intaglio process: the inking, the tarlatan, the paper, and the etching press, kindly on loan to my small studio at the Pajama Factory from artist/printmaker Chad Andrews at Studio Paper+.

“In May I returned to my studio, Boon Companion Press, to print the collagraph plates I had built in February and March.  I was a bit teary-eyed as I unlocked the studio door and stepped back into my wonderful space and intaglio printing.

“This series addresses thoughts of identity and societally expected gender symbols growing up in the 1950s.  My talented mother made most of my clothes, often from a cousin’s hand-me-downs.  I ‘build’ some of these dresses using adhesive aluminum tape and paper.  I remake them and remember.

“As a child I also remember not being allowed to go swimming because of polio.  I remember thinking the world was ending on a night I now realize was the Cuban missile crisis.  I remember crouching under my desk in duck-and-cover drills and a school trip to the closest fallout shelter where we were assured there would be canned goods and crackers.

“It is mind-boggling to imagine what today’s children will remember of their growing-up time.”