Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble to present  Fair Food Foul Play: A BTE Murder Mystery

Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble to present Fair Food Foul Play: A BTE Murder Mystery

Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble to present
Fair Food Foul Play: A BTE Murder Mystery

A New Interactive Script by Bloomsburg Native Will Ralston

Bloomsburg – Starting April 1st, Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble will present Fair Food Foul Play: A BTE Murder Mystery on Zoom. “When control of the Deep Fried Duncans TM empire comes up for grabs, a cast of oddball characters angle for glory, each harboring a potential motive for murder. In this uniquely participatory format, audience members become investigators, forming a team of fellow sleuths to interrogate the eccentric suspects in real time, and bring the culprit to justice.”

Fair Food Foul Play marks a return to the (virtual) stage for BTE, after live performances came to a halt last Spring. Will Ralston, a 1989 graduate of Bloomsburg High School with a long career in television and film (including writing credits on HBO’s Treme and The Deuce) cooked up the tale specifically for the members of BTE. Ralston, who holds a BFA in film production from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, is also serving as director of photography and editor of the filmed segments which accompany the live, interactive event.

Ensemble Member Amy Rene Byrne (in her first role since officially joining the troupe last year) serves double duty in the project, as both actor and director. Fair Food Foul Play also stars Ensemble Members Elizabeth Dowd, James Goode, Daniel Roth and Eric Wunsch, as well as BTE’s Abigail Leffler, Michaela Tloczynski, and Jon White-Spunner (in his acting debut). The program also features original music by Nick McGaw.

Though it winks at some of the markings of the traditional murder mystery, Fair Food Foul Play stays unpredictable by tossing up the mystery solution every weekend. Each night, participants will be split into groups of investigators, and work together to question the suspects in private “interrogation rooms.” Players have the option to sign up as individuals and pair up with other players over Zoom, or to sign up as households, perfect for a family game night at home. You can even request to be teamed up with other players on separate screens, near and far.

Fair Food Foul Play runs for three weekends, starting Thursday April 1st, and playing Thursdays through Sundays at 7:30pm (excluding Easter, April 4th, on which the show is closed). For technical purposes, tickets must be purchased 24 hours in advance of the show. “Seating is limited,” says Managing Director White-Spunner, “so we suggest booking now.” Tickets are available from the BTE website www.bte.org , or by calling the BTE Box Office at 570-784-8181, and don’t hesitate to leave a message.

Weis Center to Offer Free Virtual Performance that Honors Front Line Workers

Weis Center to Offer Free Virtual Performance that Honors Front Line Workers

The Weis Center for the Performing Arts at Bucknell University will offer a virtual performance of This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines created by DIAVOLO dance company from February 24-March 2. The contemporary dance film performance is 35 minutes and will be available on an unlimited basis throughout the viewing period.

The engagement is sponsored, in part, by Evangelical Community Hospital and Geisinger.

The virtual performance is free thanks to the generosity of sponsors, but registration is required by calling the Campus Box Office at 570-577-1000 or online at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice.

The performance is dedicated to all of the veterans for their service, commitment and sacrifice and to all of our COVID-19 first responders for their dedication, selflessness, resilience and heroism.

PRE-PERFORMANCE PANEL DISCUSSION
Patrons are encouraged to view a 30 minute pre-taped pre-performance panel discussion with the following distinguished guests:

  • Jacques Heim, Founder & Artistic Director, DIAVOLO | Architecture in Motion ®
  • France Nguyen Vincent, Writer and dramaturg of This Is Me
  • David Rovnyak, Bucknell University Professor of Chemistry and Bucknell/Geisinger liaison
  • Marie C. Pizzorno, Bucknell University Associate Professor of Biology and Cell Biology/Biochemistry
  • Frederick Weiss, MD, DPT, RMSK, Geisinger
  • Kendra Aucker, President & CEO, Evangelical Community Hospital
  • B. James Connolly, MD, Medical Director of Emergency Services, Evangelical Community Hospital

The panelists discuss the origins and process of filming This is Me, the mental, physical and emotional impacts of COVID-19 on front line workers in Central PA, and the history of the development of the COVID-19 vaccines, among other riveting topics.

Jacques Heim says of the pandemic, “As artists, we had to do something. For me, it’s not about creating another dance piece, but rather celebrating the amazing men and women who sacrifice themselves for us.”

France Nguyen Vincent says, “Each person in the film was asked to write about themselves and their experience. Ninety-eight percent of what you hear in the performance was written [by first responders and front line workers] and was untouched…it became a catharsis for them.”

Kendra Aucker says, “The volumes of people we’re caring for compared to normal is significant. This is something no one can imagine and no one can prepare for. The mental health challenges are showing up in the workforce, and COVID has revealed the tremendous problems that we have with access to behavioral health services for all people…especially in healthcare. We ask ourselves daily how are our people doing [and how can we support them].”

Dr. Fred Weiss says, “[COVID has hit every aspect of health and wellness]…physical, emotional, mental, moral, spiritual, social. The toll that it’s taken on a lot of friends and family…I’ve had friends who have died. A lot of the people who have contracted the disease are the front line people; the front line are dying. They are literally putting their lives at risk on a minute to minute basis…”

Dr. James Connolly says, “This is not the same as combat, but it has a similar feel. This has probably been the hardest thing I can imagine doing as a physician. There have been a lot of people in the community who have been tremendously supportive, but there have been a lot of people who haven’t and that has been so hard to deal with…Trying to convince people that this is real and we need to take it serious.”

Professor Marie C. Pizzorno says, “This is the third novel coronavirus to have jumped from animal species to humans in the last twenty years. This new virus is much more contagious. Bats maintain a population of their own coronaviruses and some have the capacity to jump to humans.” Pizzorno notes that the COVID-19 vaccines in development build on decades of coronavirus research by scientists across the globe.

PERFORMANCE
This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines is a dance film exploring how the current climate of isolation has encouraged us to look within ourselves. We follow the paths of military veterans and first responders as they share what it means to be a true warrior – to be on the front lines – and fight the invisible enemy that all humanity is currently battling. At a time when most have been asked to halt and withdraw, others, like soldiers, are charging forward.

This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines captures the resilience, determination and hope of the human spirit.

DIAVOLO is a creative movement production company that pushes the envelope of innovation by creating unique live & cinematic experiences. Using custom-made architectural structures, DIAVOLO intersects storytelling, movement and architecture with an inventive and visceral approach.

The virtual performance is free thanks to the generosity of sponsors, but registration is required by calling the Campus Box Office at 570-577-1000 or online at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice.

For more information about this Weis Center Stream and others, go to Bucknell.edu/WeisCenter or search for the Weis Center on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

Weis Center Spring Virtual Performances

Weis Center Spring Virtual Performances

Like many of you, we were eager to bid farewell to 2020 and welcome a fresh start to the new year.
We are so pleased to announce that the Weis Center will offer five virtual performances this spring and thanks to generous sponsors all of the performances will be free. Registration is required for all performances, so please contact the Campus Box Office at 570-577-1000 or online at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice for streaming details for each performance.
Sponsors for the spring performances include: Gary and Sandy Sojka, Nancy and Sam Craig, Martha and Alan Barrick and Coldwell Banker Penn One Real Estate, Chanin Wendling and Karl Voss and family, Evangelical Community Hospital and Geisinger.
If you haven’t taken the opportunity to check out our weekly Weis Center Sessions and Snaps videos, featuring members of the Bucknell community, please do so. There are so many gems! All of the videos are available on our website and on our social media channels.
We are looking forward to a time when we can safely gather together to experience the magic of the performing arts together in person. That time will come and we are actively planning for it.
Until then we are excited for you to explore our FREE Weis Center Streams virtual series, made just for you, our patrons and friends.
The Snail and the Whale (Family Discovery)
offered Jan. 22-24 with unlimited access all weekend 
The performance is sponsored, in part, by Gary and Sandy Sojka. The performance is suggested for ages 3-7 years or PreK-3rd grade. Runtime: 60 minutes.
Longing to see the world, the tiny sea snail hitches a lift on the tail of a great, grey-blue humpback whale. Together they go on an amazing journey, told through live cello music and singing, storytelling and lots of laughs … but when the whale gets beached, how will the snail save him? Join an adventurous young girl and her sea-faring father as they re-imagine the story of a tiny snail’s incredible trip around the world, inspired by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s much-loved picture book.
STONO/Step Afrika (World Music and Dance)
offered Feb. 8-21 with unlimited access 
There will also be a pre-performance talk with the Artistic Director and a post-show talk with members of Bucknell and the central PA community. Pre-performance panelists will explore the Stono Rebellion and its relevance to issues regarding political protest and structural inequities that dominate American conversations today. The performance is sponsored, in part, by Chanin Wendling and Karl Voss and family.

Step Afrika! is a dance company dedicated to the African-American tradition of “stepping”. Their dance style is a fusion of South African gumboot dance and African American stepping. Step Afrika! blends percussive dance styles practiced by historically African American fraternities and sororities; traditional African dances; and an array of contemporary dance and art forms into a cohesive, compelling artistic experience. Performances are much more than dance shows; they integrate songs, storytelling, humor and audience participation. The Company is featured prominently at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History & Culture with the world’s first stepping interactive exhibit.

On September 9, 1739, the largest insurrection of enslaved Africans in North America began in South Carolina on the banks of the Stono River. Twenty Africans marched south toward a promised freedom in Spanish Florida, waving flags, beating drums, and shouting ‘Liberty.’ This extraordinary act of rebellion in colonial America predates the famed Boston Tea Party of 1773, the first significant act of defiance to British rule over American colonists. Although the Stono Rebellion was suppressed, this little-known event in American history forever changed African American life and culture. When Africans lost the right to use their drums through The Negro Act of 1740, they began to use their bodies as percussive instruments in response. This act of survival and activism earned them the name of “Drumfolk,” coined by famed folklorist Bessie Jones. Their percussive movement gave rise to some of the country’s most distinctive art forms, including the ring shout, tap, hambone, and stepping. Stono honors the spirit of resistance and activism that remains a critical part of American freedom.
This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines created by DIAVOLO (Contemporary Dance Film)
offered from Feb. 24-March 2 
There will be a pre-performance panel discussion with Artistic Director, Jacques Heim and community members. The 35-minute performance is sponsored, in part, by Evangelical Community Hospital and Geisinger. The performance is dedicated to the heroism of frontline workers.

DIAVOLO is a creative movement production company that pushes the envelope of innovation by creating unique live & cinematic experiences. Using custom-made architectural structures, DIAVOLO intersects storytelling, movement and architecture with an inventive and visceral approach.
The 2020 premiere of This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines is a dance film exploring how the current climate of isolation has encouraged us to look within ourselves. We follow the paths of military veterans and first responders as they share what it means to be a true warrior – to be on the front lines – and fight the invisible enemy that all humanity is currently battling. At a time when most have been asked to halt and withdraw, others, like soldiers, are charging forward. This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines captures the resilience, determination and hope of the human spirit.
It is dedicated to all the veterans for their service, commitment and sacrifice and to all of our COVID-19 first responders for their dedication, selflessness, and resilience.

Learn more

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Front Row National (Classical)
offered on March 13 at 7:30 p.m. and April 11 at 2 p.m. 
Alessio Bax and Lucille Chang
The first performance in March will feature Alessio Bax & Lucille Chung (pianos) and is sponsored, in part, by Nancy and Sam Craig. The performance will include: Mozart – Concerto in E-flat major for Piano and String Quintet, K. 449 and Bartók – Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion.

Learn more

Then, on April 11 at 2 p.m. Gloria Chien (piano) will be featured and the program will include: Field – Nocturne No. 2 for Piano, Liszt – Grand duo concertant ‘Le Marin’, and Mendelssohn – Quartet in C-minor, Op. 1.
All of the Weis Center’s spring virtual performances are free, but registration is required by calling the Campus Box Office at 570-577-1000 or online at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice.
In addition to Weis Center Streams, the Weis Center is professionally producing a weekly video performance series called Weis Center Sessions and a snaptalk series called Weis Center Snaps, both featuring members of the Bucknell community. All videos are available for free on the Weis Center’s website and social media channels.
For more information about Weis Center Streams, Sessions and Snaps, go to Bucknell.edu/WeisCenter or search for the Weis Center on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.
Weis Center for the Performing Arts Announces Weis Center Streams: Five Free Virtual Performance Offerings

Weis Center for the Performing Arts Announces Weis Center Streams: Five Free Virtual Performance Offerings

The Weis Center for the Performing Arts at Bucknell University will offer five virtual performances in spring 2021. The virtual performances, called Weis Center Streams, are free thanks to the generosity of sponsors, but registration is required by calling the Campus Box Office at 570-577-1000 or online at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice.

Sponsors for the spring performances include: Gary and Sandy Sojka, Nancy and Sam Craig, Martha and Alan Barrick and Coldwell Banker Penn One Real Estate, Chanin Wendling and Karl Voss and family, Evangelical Community Hospital and Geisinger.

Performances are as follows:

The Snail and the Whale (Family Discovery) will be offered January 22-24 with unlimited access all weekend. The performance is sponsored, in part, by Gary and Sandy Sojka. The performance is suggested for ages 3-7 years or PreK-3rd grade. Runtime: 60 minutes.

Longing to see the world, the tiny sea snail hitches a lift on the tail of a great, grey-blue humpback whale. Together they go on an amazing journey, told through live cello music and singing, storytelling and lots of laughs … but when the whale gets beached, how will the snail save him? Join an adventurous young girl and her sea-faring father as they re-imagine the story of a tiny snail’s incredible trip around the world, inspired by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s much-loved picture book.

STONO/Step Afrika (World Music and Dance) will be offered February 8-21 with unlimited access. There will also be a pre-performance talk with the Artistic Director and a post-show talk with members of Bucknell and the central PA community. Pre-performance panelists will explore the Stono Rebellion and its relevance to issues regarding political protest and structural inequities that dominate American conversations today. The performance is sponsored, in part, by Chanin Wendling and Karl Voss and family.

Step Afrika! is a dance company dedicated to the African-American tradition of “stepping”. Their dance style is a fusion of South African gumboot dance and African American stepping. Step Afrika! blends percussive dance styles practiced by historically African American fraternities and sororities; traditional African dances; and an array of contemporary dance and art forms into a cohesive, compelling artistic experience. Performances are much more than dance shows; they integrate songs, storytelling, humor and audience participation. The Company is featured prominently at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History & Culture with the world’s first stepping interactive exhibit.

On September 9, 1739, the largest insurrection of enslaved Africans in North America began in South Carolina on the banks of the Stono River. Twenty Africans marched south toward a promised freedom in Spanish Florida, waving flags, beating drums, and shouting ‘Liberty.’ This extraordinary act of rebellion in colonial America predates the famed Boston Tea Party of 1773, the first significant act of defiance to British rule over American colonists. Although the Stono Rebellion was suppressed, this little-known event in American history forever changed African American life and culture. When Africans lost the right to use their drums through The Negro Act of 1740, they began to use their bodies as percussive instruments in response. This act of survival and activism earned them the name of “Drumfolk,” coined by famed folklorist Bessie Jones. Their percussive movement gave rise to some of the country’s most distinctive art forms, including the ring shout, tap, hambone, and stepping. Stono honors the spirit of resistance and activism that remains a critical part of American freedom.

This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines created by DIAVOLO (Contemporary Dance Film) will be offered from February 24-March 2. There will be a pre-performance panel discussion with Artistic Director, Jacques Heim and community members. The 35 minute performance is sponsored, in part, by Evangelical Community Hospital and Geisinger. The performance is dedicated to the heroism of frontline workers.

DIAVOLO is a creative movement production company that pushes the envelope of innovation by creating unique live & cinematic experiences. Using custom-made architectural structures, DIAVOLO intersects storytelling, movement and architecture with an inventive and visceral approach.

The 2020 premiere of This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines is a dance film exploring how the current climate of isolation has encouraged us to look within ourselves. We follow the paths of military veterans and first responders as they share what it means to be a true warrior – to be on the front lines – and fight the invisible enemy that all humanity is currently battling. At a time when most have been asked to halt and withdraw, others, like soldiers, are charging forward. This is Me: Letters From the Front Lines captures the resilience, determination and hope of the human spirit.

It is dedicated to all the veterans for their service, commitment and sacrifice and to all of our COVID-19 first responders for their dedication, selflessness, and resilience.

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Front Row National (Classical) will be offered on March 13 at 7:30 p.m. and April 11 at 2 p.m. The first performance in March will feature Alessio Bax & Lucille Chung (pianos) and is sponsored, in part, by Nancy and Sam Craig. The performance will include: Mozart – Concerto in E-flat major for Piano and String Quintet, K. 449 and Bartók – Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion.

Then, on April 11 at 2 p.m. Gloria Chien (piano) will be featured and the program will include: Field – Nocturne No. 2 for Piano, Liszt – Grand duo concertant ‘Le Marin’, and Mendelssohn – Quartet in C-minor, Op. 1.

All of the Weis Center’s spring virtual performances are free, but registration is required by calling the Campus Box Office at 570-577-1000 or online at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice.

In addition to Weis Center Streams, the Weis Center is professionally producing a weekly video performance series called Weis Center Sessions and a snaptalk series called Weis Center Snaps, both featuring members of the Bucknell community. All videos are available for free on the Weis Center’s website and social media channels.

For more information about Weis Center Streams, Sessions and Snaps, go to Bucknell.edu/WeisCenter or search for the Weis Center on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

Weis Center to Host Virtual Holiday Performance, Virtual Spring Programs to be Announced Soon

Weis Center to Host Virtual Holiday Performance, Virtual Spring Programs to be Announced Soon

The Weis Center for the Performing Arts at Bucknell University will host a virtual holiday performance of Manual Cinema’s “A Christmas Carol” on Saturday, December 5 at 8 p.m., Sunday, December 13 at 4 p.m. and Thursday, December 17 at 8 p.m.

The runtime for the performance is one hour and is suggested for ages 5+.

The performance is sponsored, in part, by Martha and Alan Barrick and Coldwell Banker Penn One Real Estate.

In this world premiere online event created for audiences of all ages, interdisciplinary performance collective Manual Cinema takes on Charles Dickens’ holiday classic with a visually inventive adaptation made to broadcast directly to your home.

Performed live in Chicago and presented by a live stream, Manual Cinema’s “A Christmas Carol” will be told with hundreds of paper puppets, miniatures, silhouettes, and a live original score in an imaginative re-invention of a cherished holiday tradition.

An avowed holiday skeptic, Aunt Trudy has been recruited to channel her late husband Joe’s famous Christmas cheer. From the isolation of her studio apartment, she reconstructs his annual Christmas Carol puppet show – over a Zoom call while the family celebrates Christmas Eve under lockdown. But as Trudy becomes more absorbed in her own version of the story, the puppets take on a life of their own, and the family’s call transforms into a stunning cinematic adaptation of Dickens’ classic ghost story.

The performance will feature: Lizi Breit (Puppeteer), Sarah Fornace (Puppeteer), Ben Kauffman (Guitar, Piano, Lead Vocals), N. LaQuis Harkin (Aunt Trudy/Puppeteer), Julia Miller (Puppeteer) and Kyle Vegter (Cello, Keys, Vocals).

Kathryn Maguet, Executive Director of the Weis Center says, “The Weis Center is excited to share a new and entirely virtual performance by the brilliant and innovative Chicago theater company, Manual Cinema. Central PA audiences may remember last year’s stunning Frankenstein which was presented last fall at the Weis Center. A Christmas Carol promises to delight and awe!”

Tickets are $20 per household and can be purchased at Bucknell.edu/BoxOffice or by calling 570-570-1000.

Ticket purchasers will receive a livestream link 24 hours prior to the performance. Please consider testing the link prior to showtime.

Purchase tickets early; ticket sales will conclude 30 minutes prior to each performance’s show time. For example, ticket sales will end at 7:30 p.m. for both 8 p.m. performances.

While online and phone call orders are preferred, tickets are also available in person at the Weis Center vestibule weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Facial coverings are required and only one party at a time is allowed in the vestibule.

For more information about this event, visit http://go.bucknell.edu/WeisCenterHoliday.

VIRTUAL SPRING PROGRAMS TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON
In the coming weeks, the Weis Center will announce details about a virtual spring 2021 season that will include half a dozen livestreamed performances including classical, modern dance, world dance and music and a family-friendly performance.

Maguet says, “The pandemic has created unique challenges for the performing arts field and has forced cancellations across the country. However, we remain dedicated to bringing thoughtful, timely and relevant work to our community in accessible ways that inspire us all to keep creating. Within the next few weeks, we will be announcing a schedule of virtual programs for spring 2021. While we miss engaging with you in person, we continue to feel energized through sharing the work of extraordinary and exceptional performing artists. We look forward to gathering again when it is safe and thank you for your ongoing support.”

For more information about the Weis Center for the Performing Arts, go to Bucknell.edu/WeisCenter or search for the Weis Center on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

Susquehanna Valley Chorale Releases Their SECOND, Free, Online Virtual Performance

The Susquehanna Valley Chorale, the area’s premier community choral singing group, will be featuring virtual performances throughout the 2020-21 season due to COVID-19, and its first recording is now available for free viewing online.

This performance is available to view for free on the Chorale’s YouTube channel, and will be shared on its Facebook and Instagram accounts, as well as on its website.  Visit svcmusic.org to easily access the recording.

Conductor and Music Director, Bill Payn, has programmed two subsequent virtual choir videos to follow the hugely successful release of the chorale’s first online performance in August featuring their student scholarship singers.  These will involve members of the larger chorale.  Dropping on October 26, the second video will be a performance of Blowin’ in The Wind, from A Dylan Oratorio.  Initially programmed for last spring, the entire work will now be presented during the 2021/2022 season.

This virtual musical experience is graciously sponsored by Bernadine Richard in memory of Jean-Paul Richard.  SVC Marketing and Development Liaison, Adam Dietz says:  “After much debate and exploration of possible repertoire for this video, this song kept resonating because of its poignant message in relation to current events over the last several months, and we are thrilled to share it with our listeners.”  The chorale will release a third video in December, showcasing two popular pieces from their Christmas Candlelight concerts.

A little about Blowin’ in The Wind…Shortly after singer-songwriter Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016, the Mendelssohn Club of Pittsburgh commissioned Steve Hackman to arrange some of Dylan’s songs into an extended work for chorus and orchestra.  Hackman, a Curtis Institute of Music graduate in his mid-30s, had previously combined classical and popular repertoire in works like Brahms v. Radiohead and directed the pop-classical crossover program FUSE for the Pittsburgh Symphony.  The result was The Times They Are A-Changin’: A Dylan Oratorio [2018].  Hackman wrote that he simply arranged some of Dylan’s songs, maintaining their musical structure; but others he treated much more freely, creating “new kinds of fantasy works around his songs.” The majority, including Blowin’ In The Wind, fell into this more creative style.  Dylan’s melody for Blowin’ in The Wind was a folk song called No More Auction Block.  It plays only a minor role in Hackman’s oratorio.  The lyric, one of Dylan’s finest, is the basis for Hackman’s imaginative creation. *

*Notes provided by Gary Boerckel, Lycoming College

“We believe music is essential, and even in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the SVC still intends to provide our local communities with incredible musical performances that provide hope, passion, and community to all who listen,” says Payn.  To experience everything the Chorale has planned for this season, please follow along on Facebook, Instagram, and visit svcmusic.org to sign up for email announcements.

The SVC was founded in 1969 by a small group of musically oriented people who wished to sing, learn, and grow together in the performance of superb choral music. The group consists of over 100 members from communities across the Central Susquehanna Valley. Led by several distinguished conductors, the Chorale has emerged as the leading ambassador of the arts in the Central Susquehanna Valley. We are the region’s only community choral group dedicated to presenting orchestra-accompanied choral music of major standing.